1772 Orange Flower Cold Cream - Makeup Remover/Cleanser/Moisturizer
1772 Orange Flower Cold Cream - Makeup Remover/Cleanser/Moisturizer

1772 Orange Flower Cold Cream - Makeup Remover/Cleanser/Moisturizer

Regular price $27.00
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A wonderful historical multi-use product every vintage enthusiast and pin-up should have in their cabinet!

From LBCC:

"The name "cold cream" derives from the cooling feeling that the cream leaves on the skin. Variations of the product have been used for nearly 2000 years. Ever wondered about 18th century Cold Cream? Well... Now you don't have to guess.. it's here!
This cold cream smells amazing. I used our Orange Flower Water. The original recipe calls for your choice of Rose or Orange Flower. Because we also have a 1901 Rose Cold Cream, I decided to make this one Orange Flower.

This cream is a bit thinner than the 1901 cold cream and the recipe is different. This one doesn't have glycerin ( our 1901 does). This is cold cream at it's absolute purest. This is a great moisturizer. It will work to take off some of the historical makeup. You may not get it to completely take off the white face paint depending on how heavy you applied it. I also did an experiment with a few days of not washing my face, then applying this cold cream and wiping it off.. I was shocked at how much dirt came off.. so this does clean the skin as well. If you don't want to solely use this as a moisturizer and remover of dirt, you can also apply after washing the face with soap and water, or after the lemon scrub or gypsy astringent.
I also use it on my hands, feet, and legs for lovely silky skin."

 

Ingredients: Virgins Wax, Jojoba, Almond Oil, Orange Flower Water, Ben

Note: This cold cream doesn't have any modern emulsifying ingredients to keep things from separating. This is one reason historical creams were sold in small jars. It will keep best in the fridge, it doesn't need to be in the fridge if you don't mind the thin consistency.

1772
Cold Cream
Scented: Orange Flower
Toilet De Flora
3.5oz

Photos courtesy of LBCC Historical